How to Wear Braces as an Adult

You were one of the lucky ones who got through adolescence without the humiliation of wearing braces. Twenty years later, though, as your orthodontist glues those little pieces of metal to your teeth, you are about to find out what it’s like to wear braces as an adult. However, with some minor lifestyle adjustments, you can survive wearing braces as an adult.

Instructions

  1. Invest in oral-hygiene tools. Wearing braces as an adult draws your attention to your oral hygiene. You will quickly discover how hard it is to clean your teeth and gums when you have a mouth full of wires. A water pick, a device that uses a small, high-pressure stream of water to remove debris from small spaces in your mouth, can be a lifesaver. Ask your orthodontist which one he recommends. Also invest in a selection of different sized toothbrushes and a fluoride rinse. When your teeth feel clean, you will be less self-conscious.
  2. Drink plenty of water. Drinking water washes food particles out of your mouth, dilutes sticky or acidic substances and keeps your mouth lubricated. Moist tissue slides better across braces and won’t get caught on rough edges and tear. Also, drinking water helps maintain fresh breath, making you less self-conscious.
  3. Abstain from sticky foods. Give up trying to chew gum or eat candy while you have braces. Also, pass on food with small particles, like popcorn. These foods will get stuck in your braces and increase your anxiety of being seen with food stuck on your teeth. Your orthodontist should provide you with a list of foods to avoid.
  4. Learn snappy come-backs. Be prepared for strange comments about your appearance with braces from friends and strangers. Kids usually just get “railroad tracks.” Because the braces make you look like a teenager, adults get interesting descriptions of people’s preferences for younger partners.
  5. Smile. Know that as an adult, your self-esteem goes deeper than your appearance. Allow your personality to shine through the braces because that’s what most people really like about you. Remember, it’s only a temporary condition, anyway. The braces will come off and your teeth will be straighter than they’ve ever been.

High carbohydrate diets linked to dementia: Eat healthy fats, say experts

Want to reduce your risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s? The latest studies show that the key to achieving that goal is simple: Eliminate carbohydrates such as sugar and grains and replace them with healthy fats, reported the Sacramento Bee on Feb. 21.

Spanish researchers evaluated the impact of diets on cognition, dividing study group participants ages 50 to 80 into three different groups:

  • One group ate a Mediterranean-style diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil
  • A second group followed a similar diet but supplement it with extra nuts rather than olive oil
  • The third group consumed a low fat diet with carbohydrates such as whole grains

The results after 6.5 years on these diets: Participants who ate the diet high in extra-virgin olive oil scored best on cognition tests, followed by those who ate nuts. The lowest scores came from those who avoided fat and ate grains.

Mediterranean diets traditionally include healthy fats such as nuts and olive oil, with total calorie intake from fats as high as 40 percent. Also included: Vegetables, fruits, nuts and legumes, with moderate to high consumption of fish and seafood and low consumption of dairy and meat. Processed grains are kept to a minimum.

What’s the link between this high fat diet and cognition? Studies show that such diets result in lower blood concentrations of inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein and reduced risk factors for vascular disease such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Both inflammation and vascular disease are known risk factors in dementia and cognitive decline.

Contrasted with such high fat, low carb diets, the standard American diet (SAD) poses risks in its high percentages of processed grains and sugars.

SAD menus result in elevated blood sugar and insulin resistance, causing glycation of proteins.Through this process, glucose molecules attach to proteins, and that’s been associated with reductions in cognitive function.